The only way to accept and be comfortable with a concept, like stuttering, is to understand it. Many fluent people have likely heard of “stuttering” but don’t understand what it is.  They could have inaccurate facts, as well.

The condition of stuttering, though rare -1% of the world’s population- has more exposure in the past few years.  Social media, for example, provides a safe place for stuttering to be discussed.  Like minded groups are free to share their thoughts and experiences without judgment.

Women Who Stutter know that they can do whatever they want to in their lives – not letting stuttering hold them back. The community of People Who Stutter is there to help and support each other.

So knowing that, let’s explore how fluent people might view stuttering.

 

What Might A Fluent Person’s Understanding of Stuttering Be?

When your image about stuttering is based on a cartoon character, a comedian’s portrayal, or a poorly depicted actor in a movie, you don’t and can’t get an accurate or realistic picture of stuttering.

The best way to learn is to get a real life glimpse. Seeing how stuttering affects the everyday life of Women Who Stutter may be intriguing.

So it is up to you, as a Woman Who Stutters, to provided accurate and realistic information.  As you explain your experience with stuttering to others, they will have your first hand account.

Who else, better than you, to do this?

By offering insight into stuttering first, with family and friends, you’ll find that speaking about your speech is liberating for both of you.

What Simple Insight Could You Offer To Change The Way Fluent People See Stuttering?

1) Not All Women Who Stutter, Stutter For The Same Reason

We don’t really know the exact cause of stuttering.  It is thought to be the result of a genetic differences, early childhood trauma or learned habits, etc.

Even with different reasons for stuttering, each person who stutters has their own ‘brand’ of speech.  It is mixed with interruptions in the flow of speech, filtered with emotions, beliefs and conditioning.

2) Women Who Stutter Have Average Intelligence

We often judge any kind of difference or abnormality as a reflection on our intelligence.  So if you do something in a different way, or speak differently or don’t follow the norm, then your intelligence could be in question.

As stuttering is evident when you are talking, the uninformed listener may think that your speech is reflecting your intelligence. This certainly is not the case.

3) Not All Women Who Stutter Have The Same Speech Pattern

Here are some descriptive aspects about stuttering:

  • Classified as mild, moderate or severe;
  • Repetition of sounds, words or sentences;
  • Blocking and not able to say the sound or word;
  • It won’t come out;
  • Exhibiting facial grimaces or vocal clicking sounds;
  • Using excessive hand, arm or body gestures while speaking.

The above terms help to describe the speech component of stuttering. Different kinds of speech patterns may not interfere with the conversation  – a good thing.

4) As A Woman Who Stutters, You Know What You Want To Say

You know what you want to say, so it’s not helpful to have your words and sentences completed for you; you’ll take a bit longer to say what you want; you appreciate  the attention and patience of the other when  you’re speaking; that helps you stay focused and speak more fluently.

5) There Is Nothing Wrong With Stuttering

Just knowing that it is OK to be different puts you at ease. Your differences make you unique.  They give you positive opportunities that you would not have had otherwise. Stuttering is a difference and it is one of your characteristics, just like your hair color or your height.Stuttering does not define you and doesn’t hold you back.

6) What Can You Share With Others About Stuttering?

Educating others about stuttering may seem like a futile thing to do. But imagine how much more informed the fluent person is when they learn about stuttering and understand how it affects you?  Or, knowing how to react appropriately to someone who is stuttering.

You are empowering fluent people, telling them your personal story and how it has shaped your life gives them insights for thinking outside the box and seeing life and business from different views.

2 Tips To Help You Share Your Story With Non-Stutterers:

1) Practice with a Friend of family member

Make a list of the reactions that you get. These reactions can become education points. Some of these reactions could be: Eye rolling, rude remarks, interrupting, chuckling, sighing, looking away, turning away.

Ask your friend(s) to act out these reactions while you are talking.

Then you respond by helping them understand more about stuttering.

This is a great way for you to practice talking about stuttering. You can clear up misunderstandings and inaccurate information. The person listening will have direct insight into your life with stuttering. What a great opportunity.

Once you feel comfortable in this practice stage, then let’s step out into the world.

2) Take Every Opportunity To Talk About Stuttering In The Positive 

Take every opportunity, at least one per day, where you can talk about stuttering.

These opportunities may be triggered by some of the reactions in the first part above.

But you may find other reactions, more subtle ones, that you would like address or add information.

Now, everyone may not want to know about stuttering, and that is OK.

There are lots of other people who really want to know —

Continue sharing information about stuttering. Each time you do, will add to your freedom and comfortability with stuttering.

Share your story… one person at a time.

 

 

 

 

 

The only way to accept and be comfortable with a concept, like stuttering, is to understand it. Many fluent people have likely heard of “stuttering” but don’t understand what it is.  They could have inaccurate facts, as well.

The condition of stuttering, though rare -1% of the world’s population- has more exposure in the past few years.  Social media, for example, provides a safe place for stuttering to be discussed.  Like minded groups are free to share their thoughts and experiences without judgment.

Women Who Stutter know that they can do whatever they want to in their lives – not letting stuttering hold them back. The community of People Who Stutter is there to help and support each other.

So knowing that, let’s explore how fluent people might view stuttering.

 

What Might A Fluent Person’s Understanding of Stuttering Be?

When your image about stuttering is based on a cartoon character, a comedian’s portrayal, or a poorly depicted actor in a movie, you don’t and can’t get an accurate or realistic picture of stuttering.

The best way to learn is to get a real life glimpse. Seeing how stuttering affects the everyday life of Women Who Stutter may be intriguing.

So it is up to you, as a Woman Who Stutters, to provided accurate and realistic information.  As you explain your experience with stuttering to others, they will have your first hand account.

Who else, better than you, to do this?

By offering insight into stuttering first, with family and friends, you’ll find that speaking about your speech is liberating for both of you.

What Simple Insight Could You Offer To Change The Way Fluent People See Stuttering?

1) Not All Women Who Stutter, Stutter For The Same Reason

We don’t really know the exact cause of stuttering.  It is thought to be the result of a genetic differences, early childhood trauma or learned habits, etc.

Even with different reasons for stuttering, each person who stutters has their own ‘brand’ of speech.  It is mixed with interruptions in the flow of speech, filtered with emotions, beliefs and conditioning.

2) Women Who Stutter Have Average Intelligence

We often judge any kind of difference or abnormality as a reflection on our intelligence.  So if you do something in a different way, or speak differently or don’t follow the norm, then your intelligence could be in question.

As stuttering is evident when you are talking, the uninformed listener may think that your speech is reflecting your intelligence. This certainly is not the case.

3) Not All Women Who Stutter Have The Same Speech Pattern

Here are some descriptive aspects about stuttering:

  • Classified as mild, moderate or severe;
  • Repetition of sounds, words or sentences;
  • Blocking and not able to say the sound or word;
  • It won’t come out;
  • Exhibiting facial grimaces or vocal clicking sounds;
  • Using excessive hand, arm or body gestures while speaking.

The above terms help to describe the speech component of stuttering. Different kinds of speech patterns may not interfere with the conversation  – a good thing.

4) As A Woman Who Stutters, You Know What You Want To Say

You know what you want to say, so it’s not helpful to have your words and sentences completed for you; you’ll take a bit longer to say what you want; you appreciate  the attention and patience of the other when  you’re speaking; that helps you stay focused and speak more fluently.

5) There Is Nothing Wrong With Stuttering

Just knowing that it is OK to be different puts you at ease. Your differences make you unique.  They give you positive opportunities that you would not have had otherwise. Stuttering is a difference and it is one of your characteristics, just like your hair color or your height.Stuttering does not define you and doesn’t hold you back.

6) What Can You Share With Others About Stuttering?

Educating others about stuttering may seem like a futile thing to do. But imagine how much more informed the fluent person is when they learn about stuttering and understand how it affects you?  Or, knowing how to react appropriately to someone who is stuttering.

You are empowering fluent people, telling them your personal story and how it has shaped your life gives them insights for thinking outside the box and seeing life and business from different views.

2 Tips To Help You Share Your Story With Non-Stutterers:

1) Practice with a Friend of family member

Make a list of the reactions that you get. These reactions can become education points. Some of these reactions could be: Eye rolling, rude remarks, interrupting, chuckling, sighing, looking away, turning away.

Ask your friend(s) to act out these reactions while you are talking.

Then you respond by helping them understand more about stuttering.

This is a great way for you to practice talking about stuttering. You can clear up misunderstandings and inaccurate information. The person listening will have direct insight into your life with stuttering. What a great opportunity.

Once you feel comfortable in this practice stage, then let’s step out into the world.

2) Take Every Opportunity To Talk About Stuttering In The Positive 

Take every opportunity, at least one per day, where you can talk about stuttering.

These opportunities may be triggered by some of the reactions in the first part above.

But you may find other reactions, more subtle ones, that you would like address or add information.

Now, everyone may not want to know about stuttering, and that is OK.

There are lots of other people who really want to know —

Continue sharing information about stuttering. Each time you do, will add to your freedom and comfortability with stuttering.

Share your story… one person at a time.

Discover Your Doorway To Easy Speaking Today!